Braising liquid

When the weather is gloomy, let the braising brighten up your meals

By definition, braising is the process of searing food in oil or by a dry heat method such as grilling and then cooking it in a liquid. The searing adds flavor; cooking in liquid tenderizes the meat.

Ruhlman describes braising as a metamorphosis. “When you braise you start with a tough and often inexpensive cut of meat, and with your care and knowledge as a cook, you turn it into something tender, succulent and exquisite. “

And it works just as well for vegetables like artichokes and leeks as it does for lamb shanks and brisket.

Here are some tips for embers from Anthony Puharich and Libby Travers from “The ultimate meat companion“(The Countryman Press, $ 45):

• Gently season the ingredients to start, but don’t season the dish until the very end, after the sauce has reduced, or you risk the whole dish becoming too salty.

• When using wine or beer in your cooking liquid, remember that you will be cooking alcohol and most complex flavors.

• Use a cartridge, a round of parchment paper cut only slightly larger than the diameter of your casserole dish. Crumple it up and wet it before placing it on the embers. This helps prevent the liquid from evaporating too quickly and prevents a skin from forming on the sauce. Some recipes will require the use of a cartridge without a cover; others add a cover as additional protection for the embers.

Try these recipes and people will say, “Smells good in here” when they walk in the door.

RECEIPTS

Never attempt a braised meat recipe on a day when you are faced with a deadline. As Anthony Puharich and Libby Travers write in “The Ultimate Companion to Meat” (The Countryman Press, $ 45), “There is no rush to brais. ahead of time, giving the meat time to tell you it’s ready.

Legend

If the weather gets you in the mood for a beef stew, a little extra time and effort can produce Beef Daube, adapted from a recipe from “The Ultimate Companion to Meat” by Anthony Puharich and Libby Travers ( The Countryman Press, $ 45). CONTRIBUTED BY ALAN BENSON

If the weather gets you in the mood for a beef stew, a little extra time and effort can produce Beef Daube, adapted from a recipe for
legend arrowLegend

If the weather gets you in the mood for a beef stew, a little extra time and effort can produce Beef Daube, adapted from a recipe from “The Ultimate Companion to Meat” by Anthony Puharich and Libby Travers ( The Countryman Press, $ 45). CONTRIBUTED BY ALAN BENSON

Braised beef

A stew is a classic dish of inexpensive beef braised with wine, vegetables and seasonings. Anthony Puharich and Libby Travers polish the recipe using a flat iron steak instead of the chuck you might expect. They had a lot of umami by including anchovies and olives in the final dish and adding a small amount of vinegar to cut through the richness.

Consider this as an option the next time you think of a “beef stew” for dinner. Just prepare ahead as you will be marinating the beef overnight.

Braised beef

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 yellow onions, chopped
  • 2 chops of celery, chopped
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 2 sprigs of thyme
  • 2 fresh bay leaves
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 cups of dry red wine
  • 2 1/4 pound flat iron steaks, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 can (28 ounces) whole tomatoes, drained and chopped
  • 2 small fennel bulbs, thinly sliced, fronds reserved for garnish
  • 1/4 cup chopped pancetta
  • Zest of 1 orange, divided
  • Bouquet garni (2 sprigs of rosemary, 2 sprigs of thyme, 2 sprigs of Italian parsley, 2 bay leaves, tied with kitchen twine)
  • 2 tablespoons salted butter, room temperature
  • 4 finely chopped anchovies
  • 1/2 cup black olives
  • 2 teaspoons of red wine vinegar
  • Salt and pepper
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish
  • Make the marinade: In a large saucepan, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onion, celery and carrot and sauté until tender and translucent, about 7 minutes. Add the rosemary, thyme, bay leaves and garlic and sauté for 2 minutes. Then add the wine and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool completely, then place in a large bowl or refrigerator bag. Add the beef and refrigerate overnight, turning occasionally.
  • Heat the oven to 325 degrees.
  • Pour the meat and the marinade into a large Dutch oven. Add the tomatoes, fennel, pancetta and half the orange zest. Add the bouquet garni. Cut a round of parchment paper just a little larger than the diameter of the pot. Crumple the paper then wet it under running water. Place it directly on the surface of the mixture, pressing down to remove air bubbles. Cover the pot and put in the oven. Cook for 1 hour, then reduce the temperature to 235 degrees and braise 3 to 4 hours or until the meat falls apart easily. Remove from the oven and discard the bouquet garni. Skim the fat from the surface.
  • In a small bowl, combine the butter and anchovies. Add to the cooking liquid. Add the olives and vinegar. Taste for seasoning, adding more vinegar, salt and pepper as needed. Serve garnished with chopped parsley, chopped fennel leaves and the rest of the orange zest. For 6.

Nutritional information

Per portion: Per serving: 598 calories (percent of calories from fat, 55), 40 grams of protein, 22 grams of carbohydrate, 4 grams of fiber, 34 grams of fat (13 grams saturated), 108 milligrams of cholesterol, 906 milligrams sodium.

– Adapted from a recipe in “The Ultimate Companion to Meat” by Anthony Puharich and Libby Travers (The Countryman Press, $ 45).

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Brad Parker, Executive Chef of Dantanna’s Buckhead, prepared this Schweinebrate. He suggests using a Bavarian marzen beer in the braising liquid. Here it is shown with a German potato salad. STYLE BY BRAD PARKER / CONTRIBUTE BY HENRI HOLLIS

Brad Parker, Executive Chef of Dantanna's Buckhead, prepared this Schweinebrate.  He suggests using a Bavarian marzen beer in the braising liquid.  Here it is shown with a German potato salad.  STYLE BY BRAD PARKER / CONTRIBUTE BY HENRI HOLLIS
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Brad Parker, Executive Chef of Dantanna’s Buckhead, prepared this Schweinebrate. He suggests using a Bavarian marzen beer in the braising liquid. Here it is shown with a German potato salad. STYLE BY BRAD PARKER / CONTRIBUTE BY HENRI HOLLIS

Brad Parker’s Schweinebrate

This traditional German dish is an Oktoberfest specialty, a pork shoulder cooked long and slow in a rich sauce. Brad Parker, executive chef at Dantanna’s Buckhead, has adapted his recipe from the traditional, and suggests using a Bavarian marzen beer in the braising liquid. You want to use a beer with a nice balance of hopping malt. The alcohol will cook, but the flavor remains and the resulting sauce is delicious.

Parker suggests pairing this braised pork with sauerkraut and a German potato salad.

Brad Parker’s Schweinebrate

  • 1 tablespoon of kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon of Spanish paprika
  • 1 teaspoon of ground caraway
  • Stone ground mustard
  • 4 pounds boneless pork shoulder
  • 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil
  • 2 carrots, cut into large cubes
  • 1 large onion, cut into large cubes
  • 1 Bavarian-style beer (12 ounces)
  • 2 cups chicken broth, divided
  • In a small bowl, combine the salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika and caraway. Stir in enough mustard to make a smooth paste.
  • Heat the oven to 350 degrees.
  • Pat the pork shoulder dry and coat with the mustard mixture.
  • In a large Dutch oven, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Brown the pork shoulder on all sides, about 10 minutes total. Remove the pork from the pot and add the carrots and onions. Reduce the heat to medium and cook the vegetables until tender, about 10 minutes. Leave the vegetables in the pot and deglaze the pot with beer and 1 cup of chicken broth. Return the pork to the pot and place, uncovered, in the oven. Braise until pork reaches 165 degrees and meat is tender, about 2 hours. If you find that the meat is browning too much before the pork is tender, cover the pot with its lid. Remove the pot from the oven, remove the pork from the mixture and let stand. Strain the liquid into a medium saucepan. Add the rest of the chicken broth and bring to a boil. Cook until the mixture has the consistency of a sauce. When the pork has rested for 15 minutes, it is ready to serve. Slice and garnish with sauce. For 12.

Nutritional information

Per portion: Per serving: 270 calories (percent of calories from fat, 40), 33 grams of protein, 4 grams of carbohydrate, 1 gram of fiber, 12 grams of fat (4 grams saturated), 97 milligrams of cholesterol, 629 milligrams sodium.

– Adapted from a recipe provided by Executive Chef Brad Parker of Dantanna’s Buckhead.

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A cute side dish for braised meat is Butter Braised Radishes with English Peas, adapted from a recipe in “How to Braise” by Michael Ruhlman (Little, Brown and Company, $ 25). CONTRIBUTED BY DONNA TURNER RUHLMAN

A nice side dish for braised meat is butter braised radishes with English peas, adapted from a recipe for
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A cute side dish for braised meat is Butter Braised Radishes with English Peas, adapted from a recipe in “How to Braise” by Michael Ruhlman (Little, Brown and Company, $ 25). CONTRIBUTED BY DONNA TURNER RUHLMAN

Braised radish in butter with English peas

These radishes are the perfect accompaniment to any braised meat you serve. The recipe follows the rules of a coals – sear the radishes in butter, then cover them to cook in the liquid they produce – but you want to cook them until they are tender, without collapse.

You’ll find farmers bringing beautiful radishes to your local farmer’s market, including the pretty French breakfast radishes pictured here. But no fancy radish is required. If you are using regular red radishes, cut them into halves or quarters.

Braised radish in butter with English peas

  • 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 1 pound of radish
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 cup English or snow peas, blanched
  • In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the radishes and a big pinch of salt. Toss the radishes in the butter until coated, then cover the pan, reduce the heat to low and braise for 5 minutes. Uncover, add the peas or snow peas. Increase the heat to medium, toss the peas with the radishes until the peas are heated through. Use immediately. For 4.

Nutritional information

Per portion: Per serving: 98 calories (percent of calories from fat, 55), 2 grams of protein, 9 grams of carbohydrate, 3 grams of fiber, 6 grams of fat (4 grams saturated), 16 milligrams of cholesterol, 56 milligrams sodium.

– Adapted from a recipe in “How to Braise” by Michael Ruhlman (Little, Brown and Company, $ 25).

To exploreRead AJC’s Fall Meal Guide: The Noodle Edition

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