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Milk Braised Pork Recipe — The Mom 100

Braised pork in milk

This classic Italian milk-braised pork (called Maiale al Latte) is so simple to make and so delicious. It comes from the Emilia-Romagna region, and the simmered pork becomes incredibly tender. The milk proteins tenderize the pork and add a bit of salty sweetness to the incredibly flavorful sauce.

What Kind of Pork to Use in Milk Braised Pork

that’s a great question. It is traditionally made with pork loin, but traditionally the pork was not raised to be as lean as it is today. So the pork loins of yesteryear had more fat in them, which is what you want. Look for pork loin that has been sustainably raised by a small producer, perhaps a heritage pig. This pork will look more like the pork loin cuts used to make this dish in Italy, and you will end up with a very tender braised pork dish. Commercially raised pork could end up being drier.

You can also use a small pork shoulder, which will have a good amount of fat. If you go this route, you may need to let the sauce rest at the end and skim off any excess fat that rises to the top before serving or pureeing the sauce.

Braised Pork in Milk: This classic Italian pork dish is cooked until fork tender and served in a milk-based sauce with a wonderfully rich flavor.

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Braised pork in milk

Why does the sauce separate in braised pork in milk?

The milk slowly caramelizes during the braising process, enhancing the natural sugars in the milk. Natural lactic acid helps break down pork, making it deliciously tender. The sauce will probably start to fall apart or curdle – it’s supposed to! It may not look so pretty, but it’s those curds that add so much flavor to the sauce and dish.

However, you can also choose to blend the sauce in a blender or food processor to emulsify it and make it smoother. (A lot of Italian grandmothers might resent you for that, but you decide!). I did this, so that the generous amount of leeks I used in the braise could be incorporated into the sauce. The sauce was just amazing, and you should make sure to serve it with something starchy and also crusty bread so you don’t waste a drop.

Braised pork in milk

How to make braised pork in milk

Preheat the oven to 275°F. Season the pork loin with salt and pepper.

Heat the oil in a large saucepan with a lid over medium-high heat. Add the pork and brown for about 10 minutes total, turning about every two minutes while the underside browns. Transfer it to a plate. Drain the fat from the pan.

Return the pan to medium-high heat and add the butter. When the butter is melted add the leeks. Sauté for 5 minutes until the leeks begin to soften. Add the crushed garlic cloves and leeks, and sauté for 2 minutes until the cloves turn light golden. Pour in the hot milk and add the lemon zest, sage, thyme and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, return the pork to the sauce, fat side up.

Cover and transfer the pan to the oven, turning the pork about every 45 minutes, for 2½ hours. Remove the lid and continue cooking uncovered for about 30 minutes until the pork and leeks are very tender. The pork’s internal temperature should read 140°F on an instant-read thermometer.

Braised pork in milk

Transfer the pork to a cutting board and let rest for 10 minutes before slicing. While the pork is resting, remove and discard the zest and herbs, and continue to simmer the sauce in the pan over medium-high heat until it becomes a thick sauce. Sauce may appear slightly broken or curdled; that’s good, what happens when dairy products are cooked for a long time. If you prefer (and I did), you can pour the sauce into a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. If the sauce looks appealing as is, you can skip this step and leave the vegetables intact in the sauce.

Braised pork in milk

Thinly slice the pork and serve hot with the sauce.

What to serve with braised pork in milk:

Braised pork in milk

Other Italian pork dishes:

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  • Kosher salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 soup spoons olive oil
  • 1 (3 ⅓ lb) pork loin
  • 2 soup spoons Butter without salt
  • 2 leeks trimmed and sliced ​​(use only the white and very light green parts; save the rest for the broth)
  • ten cloves Garlic peeled and crushed (see note)
  • 3 cups whole milk warmed up
  • 4 bands lemon zest
  • 3 strands fresh sage
  • 3 strands fresh thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Preheat the oven to 275°F. Season the pork loin with salt and pepper.

  • Heat the oil in a large saucepan with a lid over medium-high heat. Add the pork and brown for about 10 minutes total, turning about every two minutes while the underside browns. Transfer it to a plate. Remove any excess fat from the skillet.

  • Return the pan to medium-high heat and add the butter. When the butter is melted add the leeks. Sauté for 5 minutes until the leeks begin to soften. Add the crushed garlic cloves and leeks, and sauté for 2 minutes until the cloves turn light golden. Pour in the hot milk and add the lemon zest, sage, thyme and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, return the pork to the sauce, fat side up (the sauce should cover about two-thirds of the sides of the pork). Cover and transfer the pan to the oven, turning the pork about every 45 minutes, for 2½ hours. Remove the lid and continue cooking uncovered for about 30 minutes until the pork and leeks are very tender. The pork’s internal temperature should read 140°F on an instant-read thermometer.

  • Transfer the pork to a cutting board and let rest for 10 minutes before slicing. While the pork is resting, remove and discard the zest and herbs, and continue to simmer the sauce in the pan over medium-high heat until it becomes a thick sauce. Sauce may appear slightly broken or curdled; that’s good, what happens when dairy products are cooked for a long time. If you prefer (and I did), you can pour the sauce into a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. If the sauce looks appealing as is, you can skip this step and leave the vegetables intact in the sauce.

  • Thinly slice the pork and serve hot with the sauce.

To crush garlic, simply place it on a cutting board and place the side of a large, heavy chef’s knife over a few cloves at a time. Use the bottom of your fist to strike the side of the knife so the blade crushes the garlic underneath. Repeat with the rest of the cloves.

calories: 501calories | Carbohydrates: 9g | Protein: 41g | Big: 33g | Saturated fat: 12g | Polyunsaturated fats: 3g | Monounsaturated fat: 14g | Trans fat: 0.1g | Cholesterol: 136mg | Sodium: 134mg | Potassium: 863mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 640UI | Vitamin C: 6mg | Calcium: 170mg | The iron: 2mg

The nutritional values ​​are provided for information only. It is not intended to replace the advice of a qualified healthcare professional.

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